The 3P Hitch
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The 3P Hitch
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FAQs

We get a lot of questions about our product in relation to old designs being marketed as the best thing since sliced bread.

Below are the facts about the ProPride 3P hitch in relation to the old Hensley Arrow design. You will not always get the facts when speaking to the company that makes the old design. No product in the history of the world ever stays the same. A constant improvement process must continue daily for a company to stay viable. That is the way we approach our product and the way Jim Hensley continues to improve his original design.

Is the ProPride 3P similar to the Hensley Arrow hitch?

Yes, both hitches operate through the exact same principle of pivot point projection. Jim Hensley's original design patents addressed the mechanism for this projection. He licensed those patents to a man named Colin Connel who started the company Hensley Mfg., Inc. Jim Hensley never sold anything to the company named after him. He only licensed his patents to them. Through the years Jim continued to make improvements to his original design but the company never licensed any of them. In 2007, ProPride licensed all of Jim Hensley's patents to improve his original design. The complete story is on The Jim Hensley Hitch Story page.

What improvements have been made in the ProPride 3P compared to the Hensley hitch?

How is the ProPride 3P trailer sway control hitch different from other sway control hitches?

Conventional trailer sway control hitches apply some type of friction force to damp trailer sway. When a force is applied to the trailer it will attempt to pivot at the hitch ball. Any hitch that allows the trailer to pivot on the ball will allow the trailer to sway. Many hitches have friction forces integrated into the hitch design to damp that sway force.

Pivot Point Projection

The 3P works by projecting a virtual pivot point(tm) to near the rear axle of the tow vehicle. With Pivot Point Projection(tm), or 3P, technology incorporated in the main hitch head, the trailer's effective pivot point is no longer at the hitch ball when a force acts upon the towed trailer. The forward effective pivot point of the trailer shortens the lever arm distance between the pivot point of the trailer and the rear axle of the tow vehicle. Shortening that distance has a dramatic effect on the stability of both the trailer and the tow vehicle when the trailer is acted upon by an outside force. Many people who tow fifth wheel trailers or gooseneck trailers are familar with the stability that a forward pivot point provides.